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Connie Cleveland Training Tips

Connie's Corner

Practicing the Advanced ExercisesTraining with Friends or Teaching Class
Fixing the "Zoomies"There is one thing worse than a dog that does not come when he is called. That is a dog that runs...
Teaching Obedience Classes- Part II: CommunicationI have spent my entire professional career teaching obedience classes. In Part I of this series, I...
Teaching Obedience Classes - Part IIn December of 2018, I completed 32-years of instructing dog obedience classes. I love teaching, and...
Electric Collars: Not a Quick FixAs concerned and conflicted as I was about bringing up the subject of electric collars, I am surpr...
Electric Collars: Enforcing Commands or Stopping Unwanted Behavior?As I expected, I received a lot of feedback in response to my first message about electric collar...
Electric Collars - A Forthright DiscussionIt’s time for forthright discussion about the use and misuse of electric collars (e-collars)...
Distracted or Refusing to Retrieve? I was practicing the retrieve on the flat with my young obedience dog when a friend walked near. A...
Teaching the Retrieve - Addressing the Controversy - Part 2In order to compete in obedience, teaching a dog that he must retrieve on command is equal in impo...
Teaching the Retrieve - Addressing the Controversy - Part 1Teaching the Retrieve - Addressing the Controversy Part I I don’t remember life be...
Command Discrimination - One Year LaterCommand Discrimination - One Year Later All videos are located at the bottom of this page. A...
Improve Attitude with Reward Markers It's true! Dogs perform faster and with enthusiasm when we use reward markers to indicate exactly what our dogs have done to earn the reward. Are you doubtful? Join me on November 15th at 8:00 p.m. (EST) for a discussion about using reward markers in dog training.
Make Training Fun For someone that has been competing and teaching obedience for as many decades as I have, "making obedience fun" has been an ongoing process, a transformation over time. Training became truly fun when I learned how to effectively use a reward marker.
Teaching the New Obedience Dog: Sample Training Session Keep your training sessions short and plan a variety of skills to work on. You are training an inexperienced dog and just as a kindergarten teacher is constantly changing subjects, so should you.
Teaching the New Obedience Dog: Prerequisite Skills This is the fifth message in a series of training tips for the new obedience dog. This message describes how certain skills should be taught in a specific order and how other skills are related but may be taught in any order.
Teaching the New Obedience Dog: Let's Start Jumping!If you've been following the series of messages about Training the New Obedience Dog, you've had an opportunity to introduce your dog to skills that will form a solid foundation for your dog. This week, I want you to introduce your dog to the bar and high jumps.
Teaching the New Obedience Dog: Time to learn some new skills!I often hear people complain that "playing with their dog is fun," and "obedience training," is not. Have you tried the skills described in my last two messages? Have and your dog had any fun practicing them? It's time for your dog to learn some new skills.
Teaching the New Obedience Dog: Using TargetsDeciding where to begin training with a new obedience dog can be overwhelming. There are many choices and so much they need to learn! The next skill I teach inexperienced dogs is how to use a target for teaching a Sit, Down and Stand. Teaching a dog to Sit, Down and Stand on a platform creates a solid foundation for several obedience exercises.
Training the New Obedience Dog - Getting StartedI often ask the participants at my seminars: "If you were by yourself in this facility, with time to train, what would you work on?" Participants that have the most trouble answering this question are the ones who are starting new obedience dogs. There is so much to work on, the trouble is knowing where to start. Over the next few messages, I will show you how to teach your dog the skills that every new obedience prospect needs learn. If you have a new dog or one that you've already started, follow along to ensure that you haven't missed an opportunity to lay a solid foundation.
Utility and Beyond If you aspire to earning obedience titles beyond your UD, do yourself a favor and turn your dog into a Utility machine. All the advanced titles, the Obedience Trial Championship, the Obedience Master Titles, and the UDX, are simpler when your dog can consistently qualify in the Utility class.
Utility or Bust Pursuing a Utility title marks a critical time in your dog's obedience career. I'd like to offer you an important strategy that I believe will help you achieve this goal. The Troublesome Top Three technique is particularly useful when pursuing advanced titles but can be adopted at any time in your dog's obedience career.
Understanding Direct and Indirect Paths to Problems SolvingWhen you approach a problem directly, your dog's understanding of the required behavior should be the same as yours. When you approach a problem indirectly, you solve a problem by causing the correct behavior to happen. Here are a few examples to further explain direct and indirect approaches to solving problems.
Perfecting the Dumbbell Pick-up, Part 2I hope you enjoyed my message and video about Perfecting the Dumbbell Pickup. I provided you with the first three steps I use to teach dogs that it matters how they pick up a dumbbell. The steps are intended to explain to a dog that he simply does not have time to hit the dumbbell with his feet. Watch this video for the next steps in the technique I use to teach a dog that it matters how he picks up a dumbbell.
Perfecting the Dumbbell Pickup One of the most frequently asked questions I receive is about dogs that have poor dumbbell pick-ups. Some dogs hit the dumbbell with their feet, some push it with their nose, but in either case, they lose points for a poor pick-up. Teaching a dog that it matters how he picks a dumbbell up is tricky. The technique I use includes several steps. The first three steps are demonstrated in the following video.
Wrong in the Ring Webinar - April 18thThanks for your responses to my video series about mistakes that only happen in the ring. So many of you have contacted me with questions and comments. I am creating a list of your questions about "mistakes that only happen in the ring" such as the dog that brings back more than one glove, freezes on the drop signal, wanders around on his finishes, fails to sit at go-out or takes steps after giving him the stand signal.

I am planning a one-hour webinar on Wednesday, April 18 at 7:00 p.m. to answer these questions and as many others as I possibly can - so keep sending them to me! To participate in this FREE webinar, you must own a copy of Wrong in the Ring (as a digital obedience guide or E-Book). If you do not own Wrong in the Ring, there is still time to purchase it before the webinar.